Pietro Braido – Don Michele Rua primo autodidatta «Visitatore» salesiano. Relazione di «ispezioni» nelle prime istituzioni educative fondate da don Bosco

Sembra ormai accertato che don Bosco è all’origine di una straordinaria esperienza educativa più che di una teoria pedagogica sistematica. Può ritenersi altrettanto indubitabile che la sua effettiva comprensione non possa essere garantita dalla sola analisi (teologica, filosofica, pedagogica, psicologica, sociologica e simili) dell’apparato concettuale ad essa soggiacente. Integrativa, anzi primaria, dovrebbe considerarsi l’attenta ricerca dei fattori contestuali che le conferiscono la caratteristica fisionomia vitale, esperienziale. Tra essi entrano certamente in gioco le persone, l’ambiente (o gli ambienti), la temperie culturale e affettiva. Continue reading “Pietro Braido – Don Michele Rua primo autodidatta «Visitatore» salesiano. Relazione di «ispezioni» nelle prime istituzioni educative fondate da don Bosco”

Giovanni Bosco – Difficult relationships with the Archbishop of Turin

Relationships between Don Bosco and Archbishop Gastaldi went through two different stages, one of great understanding and cooperation, and another of notable difficulties and conflicts. The watershed could be considered to be Gastaldi’s transferral from the Episcopal See of Saluzzo to being Archbishop of Turin in 1871.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Difficult relationships with the Archbishop of Turin”

Giovanni Bosco – Interventions to solve the matter of Bishops’ ‘Temporalities’ (1872-1874)

The Law of Guarantees on 13 May 1871 and decrees applying to this required that for newly appointed bishops to enter into possession – the so-called temporalities – they had to present the Minister with the original decree of appointment and formally ask for the exequatur to be granted. This act, in the Holy See’s judgement, implied recognising the Kingdom of Italy which came into being in 1861, and included part of the Papal States ‘illegally’ taken from the Pontiff.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Interventions to solve the matter of Bishops’ ‘Temporalities’ (1872-1874)”

Giovanni Bosco – Indicators to the Holy see for the choice of new bishops for vacant sees (1867-1877)

One of the most difficult conflicts to resolve in relationships between the Holy
See and the new Kingdom of Italy was that of the dozens of Episcopal sees left vacant
for political reasons. Both parties were aware of the seriousness of the situation, but
attempts to exit from the situation were shipwrecked by the persistent serious friction
brought about by proclaiming a Kingdom which comprised territories taken from
the Papal States (1861). Only in 1865-1867 did a process of détente coming
into place, where, having overcome mutual resistance, the Holy See succeeded in
appointing many bishops with the agreement of authorities of the Kingdom.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Indicators to the Holy see for the choice of new bishops for vacant sees (1867-1877)”

Giovanni Bosco – Confidential letters to the Pope concerning the political situation (1858-1867, 1873)

In the years immediately preceding and following Italian Unity (1858-1866), Don Bosco kept constantly in touch with Pius IX by letter. He did this not only for interests directly relating to his work, but also in reference to the worrying situation the Church was going through in Piedmont, to encourage him in his defence of the faith against the enemies of religion, and to pass on to him any likely reserved information in his possession. As already indicated, Don Bosco was with Pius IX and his Secretary of State, Card. Antonelli, on the Roman question. Slowly however, he became convinced that a too vigorous resistance to the “revolution” was becoming ever more pointless, even risked worsening the situation, so after the capture of Rome he chose, also politically, the principle of doing whatever good could be done.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Confidential letters to the Pope concerning the political situation (1858-1867, 1873)”

Giovanni Bosco – Salesian Cooperators Association

The Salesian Cooperators association, which came into being in 1876, just two years after the approval of the Constitutions of the Salesian Society, is the last group that Don Bosco founded. As with ADMA he did not ask the Holy See for formal, canonical approval of the association; he considered it sufficient for the aims of the Salesian Cooperators Association to gain moral recognition through the granting of indulgences by the Pope and favourable recommendation by some bishops.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Salesian Cooperators Association”

Giovanni Bosco – The Institute of the Daughters of Mary Help of christians

In the early 1870s, when the Salesian Society was going through a happy time of expansion beyond the borders of Piedmont, thanks also to the many vocations flowing in, Don Bosco, with a group of Daughters of Mary Immaculate at Mornese who were gathered around Mary Domenica Mazzarello (1837-1881), gave life to the Institute of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians. In a very short time it was approved by the Diocesan Ordinary and aggregated to the Salesian society, then spread throughout Italy and overseas. We publish here five documents on this women’s foundation.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – The Institute of the Daughters of Mary Help of christians”

Giovanni Bosco – Association of Devotees of Mary Help Of christians

When he had built the church of Mary Help of Christians at Valdocco in Turin in 1868, Don Bosco had it consecrated with an entire cycle of celebrations made available for the public domain through an appropriate booklet. Then he set out to make it an attractive centre for prayers, thanks and donations through a second larger book. Still not satisfied he sought to give stability to general devotion to Mary under the title of Mary Help of Christians through a lay association which bore that name.

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – Association of Devotees of Mary Help Of christians”

Giovanni Bosco – National and international geographic expansion of salesian work

From 1863 onwards the Salesian work which arose at Valdocco and through other oratories in Turin began to expand rapidly, as already indicated, through numerous foundations first in Italy—Piedmont, Liguria (no. 18) and then in other regions—and finally in France and Latin America (nos. 21, 24, 25, 27).

Continue reading “Giovanni Bosco – National and international geographic expansion of salesian work”

Proudly powered by WordPress | Theme: Baskerville 2 by Anders Noren.

Up ↑